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    Entries in mahmoud ahmadinejad (4)

    Monday
    Dec142009

    Latest Revelations On The Iranian Nuclear Threat

    Secret Documents Reveal Iran’s Smoking Gun’ for Nuclear Bomb

     
    by Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu

    (IsraelNN.com) Secret documents obtained and translated by the Times of London reveal that Iran has been working for two years on a plan to test a nuclear bomb component that triggers an explosion.

    American intelligence experts previously had denied Israeli reports on Iran’s nearing nuclear capability. They claimed that Tehran in 2003 had halted preparations to make nuclear weapons and would not resume work on the project before mid-2007. The United States earlier this year admitted its information was incorrect.

    Mark Fitzpatrick, senior fellow for non-proliferation at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, told the Times, "The most shattering conclusion is that... this was an effort that began in 2007…. If Iran is working on weapons, it means there is no diplomatic solution.  

    “Is this the smoking gun? That’s the question people should be asking. It looks like the smoking gun. This is smoking uranium.”

    The technical document describes the use of a neutron that independent experts say have no use other than for a nuclear weapon, according to the Times.

    The documents have been transferred to the  International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the nuclear watchdog arm of the United Nations.

    The revelation is one of a series of reports the past two years that indicate Iran’s progress in manufacturing a nuclear weapon. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad repeatedly has said that Israel is a "cancer” that should be “wiped off the face of the map.”

    The U.S. Congress is pressing for tougher sanctions on Iran in a bid to cripple its economy as a way to force it to allow United Nations officials to inspect its nuclear facilities. U.S. President Barack Obama has pursued a strategy of diplomatic pressure.

     

    Thursday
    Dec032009

    Ahmadinejad taunts Israel

    Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Wednesday, Dec. 2, that Iran will enrich uranium to 20 percent. His latest show of defiance, focusing on the US and Israel, follows Tehran's announcement of plans to build another 10 enrichment plants capable of producing 300 tons of enriched uranium a year in response to the UN nuclear watchdog's censure of its second enrichment plant near Qom.

    The building of two new plants will begin in two months.

    Deliberately taunting Israel, he said in a speech from Isfahan broadcast live by state television: "The Zionist regime is nothing. Even its masters cannot do a damn thing." For Tehran the nuclear issue is "over." The Islamic republic will "not back down from its rights."

    On his visit to Isfahan, site of a nuclear fuel plant, Ahmadinejad said: "The Iranian nation will by itself make the 20 percent (nuclear) fuel (enriched uranium) and whatever it needs," after threatening: "Any finger which is about to pull the trigger will be cut off."

    The western powers would not be able to isolate Iran, he said, and dismissed the possibility of a military attack.

    Tehran has turned down the international offer for Russia to convert 70 percent of Iran's low-grade enriched uranium into fuel for medical research; France was to have neutralized its possible conversion into weapons-grade material. Now, Ahmadinejad accused the Western powers and Israel of using against Tehran what he called an Iranian proposal to trade its low-enriched uranium in return for 20 percent enriched material.

    Tension between Tehran and the world powers has heightened over this controversy.

    DEBKAfile adds: The centrifuge technology that increases the concentration of U-235 isotopes up to the 5-20 percent level can also be used to increase it to nuclear-weapons grade. It is a question of intent.

    Saturday
    Nov282009

    Iranian lawmaker: Iran could leave nuclear treaty 

    (AR) TEHRAN, Iran — Iran's parliament may consider withdrawing the country from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty in response to a resolution by the U.N. nuclear watchdog censuring Tehran over its nuclear program, a hardline lawmaker said Saturday.

    Mohammad Karamirad, a senior lawmaker, said parliament may also consider blocking inspections of Iran's nuclear facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Tehran has allowed such inspections so far.

    The threats come a day after the board of the U.N. nuclear agency passed a resolution demanding Tehran immediately stop building its newly revealed nuclear facility near the holy city of Qom and freeze uranium enrichment.

    Karamirad does not speak for the government but his statements reflect hardline thinking that the government usually pursues.

    Iranian lawmakers threatened to pull the country out of the nonproliferation treaty in 2006, during another time of increased pressure by the U.N. over Tehran's nuclear program. Iran backed down, and the government has said in the past that it has no intention of withdrawing from the treaty.

    "The parliament, in its first reaction to this illegal and politically-motivated resolution, can consider the issue of withdrawing from NPT," Karamirad was quoted as saying by the official IRNA news agency, referring to the treaty.

    "The parliament ... (also) can block the entry of IAEA inspectors to the country," he said.

    Karamirad, a member of parliament's National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, said Iran was determined to continue its nuclear activities.

    Ali Asghar Soltanieh, Iran's chief delegate to the IAEA, also dismissed the IAEA's fresh demands, saying Saturday on state television that Iran will limit its cooperation with the U.N. agency to its treaty obligations and will not cooperate beyond that.

    "Our first reaction to this resolution is that they (IAEA) should not expect us to do what we did several times in the past few months when we cooperated beyond our obligations to remove ambiguities," Soltanieh said.

    Soltanieh stressed the resolution won't stop Iran from continuing to enrich uranium.

    He said the country's nuclear activities will not be interrupted by resolutions from the U.N. nuclear agency's board, the U.N. Security Council or even the threat of military strikes against the facilities.

    Friday's resolution — and the resulting vote of the IAEA's 35-nation decision-making board — were significant on several counts.

    Iranian officials have shrugged off the resolution's approval by 25 members of the 35-nation board, including the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. The vote marked a rare measure of unity from the six world powers on Iran.

    Moscow and Beijing have traditionally cautioned against efforts to punish Iran for its defiance over its nuclear program, either preventing new Security Council sanctions or watering down their potency.

    The IAEA resolution criticized Iran for defying a U.N. Security Council ban on uranium enrichment — the source of both nuclear fuel and the fissile core of warheads.

    It also censured Iran for secretly building a uranium enrichment facility, known as Fordo, and demanded that it immediately suspend further construction. The resolution noted that IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei cannot confirm that Tehran's nuclear program is exclusively geared toward peaceful uses, and expressed "serious concern" that Iranian stonewalling of an IAEA probe means "the possibility of military dimensions to Iran's nuclear program" cannot be excluded.

     

     

    Friday
    Nov272009

    Iran Tells Norway To Stay Out Of Nobel Medal Row

    (AP)  TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Norway has no right to criticize Iran for confiscating Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi's medal, Iran's foreign ministry said Friday.

    In Norway, where the peace prize is awarded, the government said the confiscation of the gold medal was a shocking first in the history of the 108-year-old prize.

    Ebadi said Thursday that authorities took the medal about three weeks ago from a safe-deposit box in Iran, claiming she owed taxes on the $1.3 million she was awarded. Ebadi says that such prizes are exempt from tax under Iranian law.

    Iran's foreign ministry spokesman, Ramin Mehmanparast, said Friday that Norway has no right to criticize Iran for enforcing its tax laws.

    He said Norwegian officials are trying to "justify ignorance and avoidance" of paying tax.

    Ebadi, a human rights lawyer, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003 for her efforts in promoting democracy. She has long faced harassment from Iranian authorities for her activities - including threats against her relatives and a raid on her office last year in which files were confiscated.

    The seizure of her prize is an expression of the Iranian government's harsh approach to anyone it considers an opponent - particularly since the massive street protests triggered by hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's disputed June 12 re-election.